Placemaking, Culture and Covid

10 November 2021

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Authors:

Trevor MacFarlane FRSA

Trevor MacFarlane FRSA

Director of Culture Commons and leading on policy for the Centre for Cultural Value’s research into the impacts of Covid-19 on the cultural sector for the Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre

Insights from our Industry Champions: In partnership with the Centre for Cultural Value

In September 2021, we consulted a Panel of our Industry Champions on their experiences of the development and sustainability of ‘Creative Places’, and how policy can support this. This Panel was commissioned in collaboration with the Centre for Cultural Value (CCV) and builds on our recent ‘Creative Places’ campaign as well a previous Industry Panel on how policymakers can support local growth.

Our virtual panel brought together some of our Industry Champions to address three questions about ‘Creative Places’ that were devised with input from the PEC, the CCV and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS):

  • What local, regional, national, or UK-wide interventions have successfully incorporated creative businesses, cultural organisations or individuals into the development and promotion of your area’s identity or brand?
  • What interventions have enabled the creative and cultural sector in your area to support the wider community (this might be through engagement with underprivileged communities, the development of skills, reinvigorating the high street or contributing to public health)?
  • What role does the creative community in your area play in attracting and retaining a creative and cultural workforce?

Our Industry Champions are respected and trusted practitioners, drawn from all parts of the creative industries and cultural sectors across the UK. They have deep knowledge of industry practice and a desire to inform academic research that leads to better policies for the creative industries. 

The Industry Champions who participated in the Panel came from a variety of subsectors, including digital, museums, crafts, graphic design, film, dance, music galleries, music, marketing, and communications. Many of them have worked in specific localities for several years which provides an invaluable insight into the ways a changing policy landscape has affected the creative and cultural ecology of their areas. Others highlighted challenges that newer and emerging businesses and organisations face when trying to embed themselves into local communities in the discussion.

This briefing outlines the key points discussed by the panel, and draws policy implications for grant giving organisations, the creative and cultural sectors, the UK Government, local authorities, and for the PEC’s research agenda. 


Photo taken in Liverpool, UK by Megan Leeming.